Learn about the differences between American English and British English. This article will help you to know the commonly confused words in British and American English. A discussion of the differences between standard American and British English.

Difference between British and American English

Here are some of the main differences in vocabulary between British and American English. Here is a collection of some commonly used words translated from British English to American English. American and British English spelling differences are one aspect of American and British English differences. It is very useful to people who visit both countries more frequently than others to convert commonly used words from British English to American English. There are many British words which are different from American words. It is an effort to provide information about the Commonly confused words in British and American English.

British English vs American English

British EnglishAmerican English
AerialAntenna
AngryMad
AnywhereAnyplace
AutumnFall
Bank noteBill
Barrister, SolicitorAttorney
BiscuitCookie
BonnetHood
BootTrunk
BracesSuspenders
CaretakerJanitor
ChemistDrug store
ChipsFrench fries
CinemaMovie
CondomRubber
ConstablePatrolman
CookerStove
CotCrib
CottonThread
CrashWreck
CrossroadsIntersection
CurtainsDrapes
DraughtsCheckers
Drawing pinThumb tack
Dual carriagewayDivided highway
DummyPacifier
Dust bin, Rubbish binTrash can, Garbage can
DustmanGarbage collector
DynamoGenerator
EngineMotor
FilmMovie
FlatApartment
FlyoverOverpass
GardenYard
Gear leverGear shift
GraduateAlumnus
GrillBoiler
Ground floorFirst floor
Gym shoes, Tennis shoesSneakers
Hand bagPurse
HoardingBillboard
HolidayVacation
HooverVacuum cleaner
IllSick
IntervalIntermission
Jersey, Jumper, Pull over, SweaterSweater
JugPitcher
LiftElevator
Lorrytruck
LuggageBaggage
MadCrazy
Main roadHighway
MaizeCorn
MathsMath
MeanStingy
MotorwayFreeway
NappyDiaper
NastyVicious, Mean
NowhereNo place
Nursing homePrivate hospital
Occultist, OpticianOptometrist
ParaffinKerosene
PavementSidewalk
PeepPeek
PetrolGas, Gasoline
PostMail
PostboxMailbox
PostmanMailman, Mail carrier
Potato crispsPotato chips
PramBaby carriage
PubBar
Public toiletRest room
PunctureBlowout
Push chairStroller
QueueLine
RailwayRailroad
Railway carriageRailway car
Reel of cottonReel of thread
Return ticketRound trip
Reverse chargesCall collect
Rise in salaryRaise
Road surfacePavement
RoundaboutTraffic circle
RubberEraser
SaloonSedan
SellotapeScotch tape
ShopStore
SilencerMuffler
Single ticketOne way
SomewhereSomeplace
SpannerWrench
Staff of a universityFaculty
SumpOil pan
SweetDessert
SweetsCandy
TapFaucet
Tap (outdoor)Spigot
TaxiCab
Tea towelDish towel
TermSemester
TightsPantyhose
TimetableSchedule
TinCan
Toll motorwayTurnpike
TorchFlashlight
TrampHobo
TrousersPants
Turn upsCuffs
Underground railwaySubway
UnderpantsShorts
Verge of roadShoulder of road
WaistcoatVest
WardrobeCloset
Wash your handsWash up
WindscreenWindshield
WingFender
ZipZipper

In British English, words that end in-l preceded by a vowel usually double the-l when a suffix is added, while in American English the letter is not doubled. The letter will double in the stress is on the second syllable.

Base WordAmerican EnglishBritish English
counselcounselingcounselling
equalequalingequalling
modelmodelingmodelling
quarrelquarrelingquarrelling
signalsignalingsignalling
traveltravelingtravelling
excelexcellingexcelling
propelpropellingpropelling

Difference between British and American Spellings of Verbs

For the spellings of verbs, Generally the rule is that if there is a verb form with -ed, American English will use it, and if there is a form with -t, British English uses it. However, these forms do not exist for every verb and there is variation. For example, both American and British English would use the word 'worked' for the past form of 'to work'. So what does tall his mean for learners of English? In the beginning, unfortunately, it means a lot of memorization (or memorisation) and of course, a few mistakes. For spoken English, the differences are barely audible, so forge ahead and don't be too concerned with whether a word is spelled 'dreamed' or 'dreamt'. With written English, however, if you are unsure about the spelling, better to ask your teacher or look the word up in the dictionary and see what the experts say.